How Creativity, Art and Filmmaking can Change your Life: Project Viewfinder Reaches out to Homeless Youth

by Peter D. Marshall

by Helen Silvis.

Thirteen years ago Hazel Malone was a homeless teen with a heroin addiction. Her childhood had been marred by abuse and instability.  Her sister, Alex, was murdered. And at age 19, she lost her boyfriend to a drug overdose and her best friend to an illness brought on by drugs.

What saved her, she says, was a project by the Northwest Film Center that unleashed her creativity and set her on a path to healing.

“When you have that many struggles in your life, sometimes it helps to have something you feel passionate about,” Malone says.

“I realized I had something meaningful to live for and something to look forward to. And it really helped me clarify my goals and what I wanted to find in life.”

Today Malone works as an animator in a film studio, as she continues her studies at Portland Community College and now at Reed College. She also will be a mentor with Project Viewfinder, the film center’s latest outreach program for homeless youth.

Read the rest of this article from The Skanner.

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