Britain enters a golden era of the short film

by Peter D. Marshall

by Sarah Morrison.

Charlie Chaplin built a career on them, and brands are now using them to sell their latest products. The short film, once a slightly marginal staple of art houses and film buffs, is experiencing a golden era in Britain and is reportedly reaching wider audiences than ever before.

Advances in film-making technology and the growth of the internet are behind the rise, experts say, but their popularity is down to more than digital progress. The short film, with its capacity to convey ideas concisely, is capturing the mood of an increasingly time-pressed, information-hungry generation.

Briony Hanson, director of film at the British Council, said we are at a “watershed moment” when it comes to the proliferation of “perfect little vessels that tell a story in their own right”. “We are looking at a golden era in Britain,” she said. “Just over 20 per cent of shorts in the total Sundance [Film Festival] selection were UK-made in 2012, while last year, the figure was 6 per cent.”

Read the rest of this article from The Independent.

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