The artists’ artist: wildlife film-makers

by Peter D. Marshall

by Emine Saner.

Five wildlife film-makers nominate their favourite living artist in their field.

Mark Deeble and Victoria Stone have produced an unbroken string of great wildlife films, notable for the variety of creatures depicted, the strange behaviours captured, and the stunning photography – but most of all for the quality of the storytelling.

Giant crocodiles stalk their prey; hippos open their mouths to have their teeth cleaned by schools of fish; tiny wasps hatch into the extraordinary world hidden inside a fig; a fish opens her mouth to release tiny fry, not realising she has been cuckolded, and they are someone else’s young. They have brought so many new, extraordinary sequences to the screen, all of them woven into deeply satisfying stories. And that, for me, is the raison d’etre for film-making.

Alan Root’s 1978 film about termites, Mysterious Castles of Clay, was nominated for an Oscar.

Read the rest of this article from the Guardian.

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