Why everyone lies about their movie’s budget

by Peter D. Marshall

This article is from the Los Angeles Times.

“I was at PEN USA’s annual Literary Awards Festival a few weeks ago, having a great time, hobnobbing with all sorts of illustrious writers, when I ran into “There Will Be Blood’s” writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson, who was there to accept an award for his film script. A huge fan of his work, I told him how much I’d liked his movie. He nodded and shyly smiled, and I thought he might say something like, “Oh, geez, thanks for the compliment.” What he really said was: “In that story you did, you got the budget wrong.”

If I actually believed in New Year’s resolutions, I’d happily promise to never write about a movie’s budget ever again — all it does is cause pain and misery, both for the press, which is always being spun by studio executives and producers, and for the filmmakers, who are always convinced that clueless reporters and columnists are wildly inflating their movie budgets. (It is safe to say that no one in the history of Hollywood has ever complained about the press underestimating the cost of his or her movie.)” Read rest of article here.

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