Is Netflix’s Move Towards Traditional Distribution In Favor of Filmmakers, But Against the Theaters?

by Peter D. Marshall

by Sarah Salovaara.

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The notion of boycotting day-and-date releases seems a bit extreme since it’s a widely practiced distribution strategy for several years running, but that’s just what AMC, Regal, Cinemark and Carmike are planning with Cary Fukunaga’s Netflix-acquired Beasts of No Nation. 

The exhibitors informed Variety that they will not screen the film for the sole reason that “they do not want to provide screens to films that do not honor what is typically a 90-day delay between a theatrical debut and a home entertainment release,” thus conflating the latter, last step in the release process, with the more preliminary day-and-date. Their reasoning, however, speaks to the absolute power that Netflix holds over other VOD platforms.

Because Netflix requires a monthly fee, rather than “a-la-carte” payment like on iTunes, the theaters are operating from the assumption that Netflix’s 57 million+ subscribers will all tune into Beasts of No Nation at home, rather than make the trip to the movies. Their choice to boycott it may, in some ways, be a financially sound one.

Read the rest of this article from Filmmaker Magazine.

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